Flogging and Eye-Gouging Are Among Iran’s Medieval Punishments for ‘Morality’ Violations

Despite the many flaws in the nuclear deal with Iran, Tehran’s nuclear program has been curbed. Yet at what cost? As the new Trump administration realizes, the Islamic Republic is still a major violator of the human rights of its people.

The regime’s continued practice of “cruel and inhuman punishments, including floggings, amputations and forced blinding over the past year, exposes the authorities’ utterly brutal sense of justice,” Amnesty International reported, continuing to express concern over executions in Iran, all of which highlight how Iran’s so-called justice system, by legalizing such brutality, has no sense of humanity.

Well into the 21st century, such an aggressive approach vis-à-vis human dignity is quite appalling, to say the least, and deserves serious attention, as Iran continues to neglect, and violate, international prohibitions issued against torture and other abuse.

The fierce battles that continue to rage against US President Donald Trump and the new administration in Washington, DC that…

The regime’s so-called “laws” provide for flogging as punishment for 100 different “offences.” Many flogging victims are protesters under the age of 35, arrested for activities considered protected under internationally recognized rights for freedom of association, belief, expression and religion. Yet Iran is a signatory to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), making it legally bound not to engage in “cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.”

Nevertheless, its obligations have been completely ignored by Tehran, with its penalties for crimes regularly including stoning to death — under the ridiculous claim of “protecting religious morals.” Such a horrific practice proves this regime knows nothing of Islam, or of any other religion, for that matter.

Journalists and bloggers in Iran are also subject to flogging for practicing their freedom of speech rights. One member of the press was sentenced to a ruthless 459 lashes for what the regime’s ruling described as “publishing lies” and “creating unease in the public mind” through his work.

Even women have received lashings for attending mixed-gender parties – considered banned under the mullahs’ sick interpretation of Islam – after being caught at such gatherings by Iran’s so-called “morality police.” Indeed, authorities are known to storm parties and beat attendees prior to their being brought to police stations, where they are insulted, interrogated and tortured. Such individuals usually receive 74 lashes and spend three nights behind bars.

While flogging remains a highly practiced method by the mullahs, Amnesty International also reported on a case in which a man’s eyes were forcibly gouged out — in a punishment known as an “eye for an eye” retribution — a horrible fate many imprisoned individuals face.

Other of Iran’s medieval practices include “cross amputations” for thieves, whose fingers and toes are cut off unevenly on either side of their bodies.

It is worth noting here that all of the above atrocities were recorded in 2016, well into the tenure of President Hassan Rouhani, ironically dubbed as a “moderate” and/or “reformist.” Rouhani, in fact, has presided over nearly 3,000 executions, surpassing any recent records set by his predecessors, including firebrand Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

Ahmed Shaheed, former United Nations special rapporteur on human rights in Iran, voiced his concerns in a report revealing that Iranian authorities in 2015 alone sent to the gallows 966-1,054 people, four of whom were under the age of 18.

Just over a month into the new year, the trend is in full swing.

“The execution of at least 57 prisoners, mostly youths, has been registered in Iran since the beginning of 2017. Twenty of the victims were hanged on January 14,” according to a statement issued by Iranian opposition National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), an umbrella group of dissidents, including the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI/MEK).

NCRI President Maryam Rajavi has long called for a firm stance on  Iran’s long slate of human rights violations, most importantly referring Iran’s dossier to the U.N. Security Council.

“The Iranian Resistance declared years ago that it calls for abolition of the death penalty and an end to torture and all forms of rights abuses in Iran,” Rajavi says.

Originally published in Algemeiner

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Crackdown wave in Iran & protests in response

Theater actor sentenced to 99 lashes

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Inhumane lashings as punishment in Iran

The mullahs’ so-called judiciary in Iran has sentenced a young theater actor by the first name of Payam to 99 lashes. This inhumane ruling was upheld yesterday by the Iranian regime’s supreme court.

It is worth noting that following the lashing of Agh Dare mine workers and 35 college students in Ghazvin being sentenced to 99 lashes each by the mullahs’ judiciary, the United Nations issued a statement condemning lashings in Iran as inhumane, cruel, humiliating and in violation of international laws.

 

 

Kurdish woman sets herself ablaze

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Women setting themselves ablaze in protest in Iran

A Kurdish woman in Iran who set herself ablaze lost her life on Tuesday, December 6th due to her severe injuries. She was held in a hospital in Isfahan.

Negin Bidkham was from the village of “Faraj Abad” near the city of Kamiyaran, western Iran. She had set herself ablaze 10 days ago.

Women of all ages committing suicide and setting themselves ablaze is the immediate result of the atrocious crackdown imposed on this sector of society by the mullahs’ regime in Iran.

 

 

 

Intelligence agency demands money from family for a prisoner’s dead body

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Bandar Abbas Prison

Agents of the notorious Ministry of Intelligence (MOIS) in Iran are demanding ransom money from the family of Reza Hossein Alizadeh in return for his corpse. Alizadeh lost his life in Bandar Abbas Prison, southern Iran, due to lack medical care.

The physical conditions of this prisoner was very dire, yet MOIS agents prevented his transfer to a hospital until he was finally taken to a hospital on Wednesday, November 16 after suffering a brain stroke. However, according to physicians his transfer was very late and there was nothing more they could do to keep him alive.

This prisoner passed away on December 7th and when his family commuted from Maku (northwest Iran) all the way to Bandar Abbas in southern Iran to retrieve his body, MOIS agents said they must first pay 7 billion rials (around $200,000). The MOIS agents said they will not hand over the body otherwise.

 

 

Political prisoner transferred to Tabriz Prison

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Political prisoner Morteza Moradpour

Political prisoner Morteza Moradpour has been transferred from Gohardasht Prison in Karaj, west of Tehran, to Tabriz Prison in northwest Iran, while 44 days have passed since his hunger strike.

Kept in solitary confinement and under inhumane conditions until his transfer, he informed his brother in a phone call about the pressures imposed on him by regime agents while in solitary confinement.

“Morteza called on Thursday afternoon. This was the first call he made after his transfer to the Karaj prison. It was completely obvious from his voice that he had become severely weak. His blood pressure is usually 8. Morteza said he remains deprived from direct access to drinking water. They rarely provide him hot water. More than anything else he is suffering from lacking blankets and the cold and dry atmohsphere in solitary confinement. Despite the fact that doctors have emphasized on providing him blankets, the authorities have refused to do so. He said he doesn’t know why but the authorities have closed even the smallest openings in his cell. Morteza insists on continuing his hunger strike to have his demands met,” his brother added.

 

 

Conditions of political prisoner on hunger strike deteriorates severely

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Conditions of political prisoner Arash Sadeghi is deteriorating

Political prisoner Arash Sadeghi, on his 45th day no hunger strike, once again began suffering from breathing and heart rate problems. He was transferred to the prison clinic and placed under oxygen.

The clinic resident doctor described his conditions as very concerning.

In the past few weeks Sadeghi has been transferred to the prison clinic many times and each night he has needed to be placed under oxygen. He has lost 18 kilograms of his weight and his blood pressure is very low.

This political prisoner is currently unable to speak and in the past few days he has been vomiting “blood clots,” and transferred to a hospital as a result. However, he was returned to prison without receiving proper medical treatment.

It is worth noting that Arash Sadeghi has been on hunger strike for 45 days protesting inhumane prison conditions and the illegitimate arrest of his wife.

 

 

Residents clash with riot police in Tehran

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Bihaghi complex in Tehran

On Thursday, December 8th the residents of the Bihaghi complex in Tehran fought back a raid staged by Tehran special riot police and municipality agents who were dispatched to force the locals to evacuate the complex.

Clashes broke out as regime agents forced 200 workers to evacuate this complex and be left in the freezing winter cold.

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Protest rallies in Tehran, Mashhad, Neishabour and Sarkhoon

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Rally protesting housing policies of Iranian regime

People from various parts of Iran in the cities of Tehran, Mashhad, Neishabour and Sarkhoon staged protest rallies.

In Tehran, people demanding their homes under the Pardis housing project rallied outside the regime’s Ministry of Road & Construction to voice their protests. They were protesting 7 years of reluctance, delays, embezzlement, money laundering and lies by regime authorities.

In Mashhad, incoming reports indicate a group of people who lost their stock investments rallied outside the regime’s governorate office in Mashhad. They were demanding attention by regime officials to their requests.

A group of people in the town of Sarkhoon, near the town of Ardel in southern Iran, held a rally outside the main oil pipeline and demanded their water pollution problems be resolved.

In Neishabour, northeast Iran, drivers of heavy machinery belonging to the municipality staged a rally protesting their paychecks being delayed for the past 7 months. This rally was held on Wednesday, December 7th.

Furthermore, drivers of private cars in this city also rallied outside the regime’s governorate office protesting not receiving their paychecks for the past few months.

 

 

Human chain in defense of Karoon River in Ahvaz

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Human chain alongside Karoon River

A group of people in Ahvaz rallied in support of Karoon River and against measures of rerouting its waters to Zayandeh River. They formed a human chain to voice their protests on Thursday, December 8th, reports indicate.

It is worth noting that to this day numerous protest rallies have been held, such as forming human chains by Ahvaz locals. However, regime officials have yet to bring an end to their destructive policies in this regard.

 

 

 

Urmia University students chant “Release all political prisoners”

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Urmia University

At a ceremony marking Students Day in Urmia University, northwest Iran, protesting students began chanting slogans demanding the release of all political prisoners.

The students also specifically demanded the release of political prisoner Morteza Moradpour.

“Freedom doesn’t mean that freedom activists must spend their lives behind bars under the most atrocious conditions, including on hunger strike,” they said.